Hand Pain, Ganglion of the Wrist

Ganglion

What is Ganglion of the Wrist?

A wrist ganglion is a swelling that generally occurs over the back of the hand or wrist. These are benign, fluid-filled capsules. Ganglions are not cancerous. Although they may grow in size, they will not spread to other parts of the body.

Symptoms of Ganglion of the Wrist

The ganglion usually appears as a bump or mass that which appear over time or appear suddenly. It may also get smaller in size and even go away, only to come back at another time.

What are the Causes?

The cause of ganglions is not known. One possible cause is the trauma causing the tissue of the joint or tendon sheath to break down forming small cysts, which then join into a larger, more obvious mass. The most likely cause involves a flaw in the joint capsule or tendon sheath that allows the joint tissue to bulge out.

What are the Treatments?

Many cysts (38-58%) disappear without any treatment at all. Treatments include using a needle to remove the cyst’s contents (aspiration). Surgical removal of the cyst is needed when the mass is painful, interferes with function especially when the dominant hand is involved, or causes numbness or tingling of the hand or fingers.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

 

Hand Pain, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

What is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Carpal tunnel syndrome occurs when the median nerve which runs from the forearm into the hand becomes pressed or squeezed at the wrist. This results in pain, weakness, or numbness in the hand and wrist, radiating up the arm.

How is Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Diagnosed?

A physical examination help determine if the syndrome are related to daily activities or to an underlying disorder and can rule out other painful conditions that mimic carpal tunnel syndrome. Electromyography is often used to confirm the diagnosis. This involves a fine needle being inserted into a muscle where electrical activities are viewed on a screen determining the severity of damage to the median nerve. Ultrasound imaging can also show impaired movement of the median nerve.

What are the Causes?

Carpal tunnel syndrome is often the result of a combination of factors that increase pressure on the median nen/e and tendons in the carpal tunnel, rather than a problem with the nerve itself. Most likely the disorder is due to a congenital predisposition. Other contributing factors include trauma or injury to the wrist that cause swelling, such as sprain or fracture. It can also be caused by medical conditions such as diabetes, arthritis, pregnancy and obesity.

What are the Treatments?

Treatments for carpal tunnel syndrome should begin as early as possible under a doctor’s direction. Initial treatment generally involves resting the affected hand and wrist for at least 2 weeks, avoiding activities that may worsen symptoms and immobilizing the wrist in a splint to avoid further damage from twisting or bending. If there is inflammation, applying cool packs can help reduce swelling. Surgery is recommended if symptoms last for more than 6 months. Surgery involves severing the band of tissue around the wrist to reduce pressure on the median nerve.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

 

Hand Pain, DeQuervain’s Stenosing Tenosynovitis

De Quervain's Tenosynovitis

What is DeQuervain’s Stenosing Tenosynovitis?

DeQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis is a condition brought by irritation or inflammation of the wrist tendons at the base of the thumb. The inflammation causes the compartment around the tendon to swell and enlarge, making thumb and wrist movement painful.

How is DeQuervain’s Stenosing Tenosynovitis Diagnosed?

Tenderness directly over the tendons on the thumb-side of the wrist is the most common finding. A test is generally performed in which the patient makes a fist with the fingers clasped over the thumb.

What are the Causes?

The cause of DeQuervain’s tenosynovitis is an irritation of the tendons at the base of the thumb, usually caused by taking up a new, repetitive activity.

What are the Treatments?

Non-operative treatments include resting the thumb and wrist by wearing a splint, oral anti-inflammatory medication and cortisone-type of steroid which is injected into the tendon compartment. The goal is to relieve the pain caused by the irritation and swelling. In some cases, simply stopping the aggravating activities may allow the symptoms to go away on their own. When symptoms are severe or do not improve, surgery may be recommended. The surgery opens the compartment to make more room for the inflamed tendons, which breaks the vicious cycle where the tight space causes more inflammation.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

Hand Pain, Mallet Finger

MalletFingerlabel

What is Mallet Finger?

Mallet finger occurs when the outermost joint of the finger is injured. With mallet finger, the tendon on the back of the finger is separated from the muscles it connects.

What are the Causes?

Commonly an athletic injury where basketball and baseball players routinely experience jammed fingers, but the injury can occur because of a crushing accident on the job or even because of a cut finger while working in the kitchen.

How to Prevent Mallet Finger?

To prevent such injuries, take care when participating in activities, including athletic events. To prevent injuries from happening again to the same finger, leave the splint on for the entire time the doctor has recommended.

What are the Treatments?

If the finger is not broken or cut, or if only a small fracture is present, the doctor applies a splint to the end of the finger so it remains extended. With a splint, the outermost joint on the injured finger is not bendable, but the rest of the finger is bendable. This splint needs to be worn for at least 6 weeks to ensure that the tendon is given the best chance of healing. Surgery is necessary if the tendon requires suturing to repair it.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

 

Hand Pain, Trigger Finger and Thumb

TriggerFingerlabel

What is Trigger Finger and Thumb?

Trigger finger is a common disorder of the hand which causes painful snapping or locking of the fingers or thumb.

What are the Causes?

The exact cause of trigger finger or thumb is not readily evident. In many cases, the condition may be the result of repetitive strain of the area due to work or hobby activities. Tasks that require monotonous grasping or prolonged use of tools for example scissors, screwdrivers, etc. which press firmly on the tendon sheath at the base of the finger or thumb may irritate the tendons and result in thickening of the tendons themselves or the tendon sheath. Trigger finger may also be associated with conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, gout or metabolic disorders such as diabetes that produce changes in the connective tissues and synovium.

What are the Treatments?

Conservative non-surgical treatment involves avoiding or modifying the activities that have caused the inflammation. Oral anti-inflammatory medications are used to reduce the inflammation or discomfort. Steroid injection may be administered directly into the tendon sheath to reduce the soft tissue swelling. In the event when it does not respond to conservative treatment, surgery may be recommended. Surgery is performed where a horizontal incision is made in the palm at the base of the affected finger or thumb. The surgeon will release the first annular band, relieving the constriction of the tendon as it passes through the sheath.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

Hand Pain, Osteoarthritis of the Fingers and Thumb

Osteoarthritis Finger

What is Osteoarthritis of the Fingers and Thumb?

Osteoarthritis of the fingers and thumb is characterized as chronic and often disabling pain and stiffness of one or more joints. Most people who are affected by osteoarthritis of the fingers and thumb are middle-aged or older.

How is Osteoarthritis of the Fingers and Thumb Diagnosed?

A physical examination can reveal abnormal range of motion in the joints, swelling, and pain or tenderness over thejoints, in particular at the base of the thumb. X-rays can showjoint damage, but pain usually precedes x-ray evidence. X-rays or other imaging studies also can detect osteophytes (bone spurs).

What are the Causes?

Osteoarthritis of the fingers and thumbs occurs when the tissue that cushions the ends of the bones in a joint (cartilage) degenerates. Cartilage keeps the joint flexible and provides protection between the bones. When the cartilage breaks down, the bones rub against each other, resulting in pain and loss of movement. Bony spurs may form around the joint, causing pain and inflammation. The exact causes for why the cartilage breaks down are unclear.

What are the Treatments?

Early osteoarthritis of the thumb can be effectively treated using non-surgical treatment options, for example non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs to reduce inflammation and swelling, icing thejoint for 5 to 15 minutes several times a day to relieve inflammation and swelling and splinting to restrict movement of the thumb.

Surgical options include carpometacarpal joint fusion (arthrodesis) an option for patients looking for pain relief who are not overly concerned about losing fine thumb motion orjoint replacement where plastic or metal prostheses are used to replace the carpometacarpal joint where the prosthesis sen/es as a spacer after the arthritic surfaces of the bones in the carpometacarpal joint are removed.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.