Ankle Pain, Achilles Tendon Rupture

Achilles Tendon Rupture

What is Achilles Tendon Rupture?

Achilles tendon rupture is where the large tendon in the back of the ankle ruptures.

How is Achilles Tendon Rupture Diagnosed?

There is a sudden pain behind the ankle. Physical examination shows a gap in the tendon and squeezing the calf muscle does not result in movement of the foot. X-rays are usually performed to evaluate for other possible conditions. A MRI scan is needed to evaluate for the severity of the tear within the tendon.

What are the Causes?

Rupture most commonly occurs during recreational sports that require bursts ofjumping, pivoting, and running. Most often these are tennis, racquetball, basketball, and badminton. The injury can also happen due to sudden trip, stumble orfall from a significant height.

How to Prevent Achilles Tendon Rupture?

Stretch the Achilles tendon before exercise, even at the start of the day helps to maintain flexibility in the ankle joint. Problems with foot mechanics can also be treated with devices inserted into the shoes such as heel cups, arch supports, and custom orthotics.

What are the Treatments?

Temporary treatment include icing the area by applying ice to the area of inflammation to help stimulate blood flow to the area, and relieve the pain associated with inflammation. However surgery is needed to repair the ruptured tendon. Post operatively, patients would require physio-therapy where physical therapists can help formulate a stretching and rehabilitation program to improve the flexibility of the Achilles tendon.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
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Bunion and Hallux Valgus

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What is Bunion and Hallux Valgus?

Hallux valgus is a condition when the big toe of the foot called the hallux starts to deviate inward towards the direction of the little toe. As the big toe drifts over into valgus, a bump starts to develop on the inside of the big toe over the metatarsal bone. This bone prominence on the inner edge for the metatarsal is referred to as a bunion.

What are the Causes?

Bunions are generally hereditary but wearing footwear that is too tight or causing the toes to be squeezed together is undoubtedly the main contributing factor for the cause of bunions and hallux valgus.

What are the Treatments?

The treatment of a bunion depends entirely on how uncomfortable it is. The initial goal of treatment options is to relieve pressure on the bunion and any symptoms that may be present and to halt or slow the progression of the joint deformity. There is no effective way of getting rid a bunion without surgery.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
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Morton’s Neuroma

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What is Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton’s Neuroma is a benign soft tissue mass that forms on the nerve which runs between the metatarsals and the ball of the foot. When the two metatarsal bones rub together, they squeeze the nerve that runs between them. This repeated squeezing, or repeated injury to the nerve, causes the nerve to swell, and eventually a benign mass occurs at the site of the repeated injury.

Symptons of Morton’s Neuroma

There is pain in the ball of the foot radiating to the adjacent toes. Neuromas can form between all of the metatarsal heads and toes, however the most commonly affected area is between the 3rd and 4th metatarsal heads and toes. The pain can be sharp, burning, or tingling in nature. The pain is usually present only when wearing shoes in particular narrow dress shoes and gradually goes away after the shoes are removed.

What are the Causes?

Common factors that contribute to Morton’s neuroma are injuries to the foot, wearing high-heeled shoes or shoes that are tight and athletic activities such as jogging that may subject the feet to repetitive trauma.

What are the Treatments?

Treatment will depend on the severity of Morton’s neuroma. Common treatment options include pain medication, arch supports, padding and taping of the foot, wearing well-fitting shoes, avoiding high heels and surgery.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

 

 

Ankle Pain, Achilles Tendinitis (Heel Cord Pain)

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What is Achilles Tendinitis (Heel Cord Pain)?

Achilles tendinitis is a syndrome of irritation of the Achilles tendon in the ankle. The Achilles tendon is the large tendon in the back of the ankle that inserts into the heel bone. When individuals overuse their Achilles tendon it becomes irritated and inflamed. This inflammation can cause pain and swelling. Furthermore, this can lead to small tears within the tendon and make the Achilles tendon susceptible to rupture.

What are the Causes?

Achilles tendinitis is most often caused by repetitive, minor impact on the affected area, or from a sudden more serious injury. Incorrect posture at work or home or poor stretching or conditioning before exercise or playing sports also increases the risk.

How to Prevent Achilles Tendinitis?

To prevent Achilles tendinitis, take the activity slow at first and gradually build up the activity level. Use limited force and limited repetitions and stop if unusual pain occurs.

What are the Treatments?

Initial treatment of Achilles tendinitis includes avoiding activities that aggravate the problem, resting the injured area, icing the area the day of the injury and taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory drugs. If the condition does not improve more advanced treatments is needed. These include corticosteroid injections and physical therapy.

 

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
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Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)

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What is Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. It is due to inflammation of a thick band of tissue called the plantar fascia, which runs across the bottom of the foot, connecting the heel bone to the toes.

How is Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)

The chief diagnostic sign of these problems is pain in the bottom of the heel or arch when first standing, which gradually improves with walking. This pain may later return with continued walking. The pain usually subsides after a period of rest.

What are the Causes?

Under normal circumstances, the plantar fascia acts like a shock-absorbing bowstring, supporting the arch of the foot. But when the tension on the bowstring becomes too great, it creates small tears in the fascia. Repetitive stretching and tearing causes the fascia to become irritated or inflamed.

How to Prevent Heel Pain (Plantar Fasciitis)?

Maintaining a healthy weight minimizes the stress on the plantar fascia and choosing supportive shoes by avoiding high heels and buy shoes with a low to moderate heel, good arch support and shock absorbency. Do not go barefoot, especially on hard surfaces.[/learn_more]

What are the Treatments?

About 90 percent of people who suffer from plantar fasciitis recover with conservative treatments in just a few months. Anti-inflammatory drugs may ease pain and inflammation, although they do not treat the underlying problem. Shock wave therapy is a good form of treatment for this condition.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

 

 

 

 

Ingrown Toe Nail

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What is Ingrown Toe Nail?

An ingrown toe nail is a painful condition of the toe. It occurs when a sharp corner of the toenail digs into the skin at the end or side of the toe. Pain and inflammation at the spot where the nail curls into the skin occurs first. The inflamed area then starts to grow extra tissue or drain yellowish fluid.

What are the Causes?

ngrown toe nail can be caused by tight-fitting shoes or high heels causing the toes to be compressed together and pressurize the nail to grow abnormally. Improper trimming of toenails can also cause the corners of the nail to dig into the skin. Disorders such as fungal infections of the nail can also cause a thickened or widened toenail to develop.

How to Prevent Ingrown Toe Nail?

The best method of prevention is careful clipping of the toenails. Toenails should be clipped straight across and taking care to keep the end longer than the skin edge. This prevents the corners from digging into the skin. They should not be rounded or cut too short. Wearing well-fitting shoes helps as well.

What are the Treatments?

Mild ingrown toenails may be treated with conservative measures like warm daily soaks, topical antibiotics, and gently pushing back the piece of overgrown skin away from the nail. More advanced ingrown toenails may require treatment with oral antibiotics. Resistant or recurrent cases of ingrown toenails may require a minor in-office procedure. Surgical procedures aim to remove the embedded nail from the toe tissue.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.

Shin Splint (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)

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What is Shin Splint (Medial Tibial Stress Syndrome)?

Shin splint is the symptom of pain over the front of the tibial bone.

What are the Causes?

Shin splints are normally due to overuse. When the overuse causes irritation to the tendons and the attachment of these tendons to the bone, the condition is called medial tibial stress syndrome. It is commonly seen in athletes who suddenly increase their duration or intensity of training.

What are the Treatments?

The treatments are applying ice packs or perform ice massage for up to 20 minutes three times a day, take anti-inflammatory medication prescribed by a doctor, or perform rehabilitation exercises regularly e.g. swimming and cycling.

Do you need a consultation? Our Orthopaedic Specialist Dr Kevin Yip has over 20 years of experience. Be assured that you are receiving the most professional treatment.
Call or SMS to 9137 7787 to make an appointment. You can also request for a call back by using our Contact Form.